California’s Uninsured Rate Hits New Record Low

 

The Centers for Disease Control released new numbers this week showing a new record low in the uninsurance rate for California and the nation. Just 8.8% of the country is uninsured, down from 14.4% in 2013, but in California, the uninsured rate is even lower, dropping to 7.1%, from a high 17%, when California had one of the highest uninsured rates in the nation.

More than ever before, more Californians have health coverage and the peace of mind and financial security that comes with it. California’s uninsured rate dropping to a record low is a testament to the expansions under the Affordable Care Act, and the will of our state to take advantage of those benefits for our citizens. All Californians should be concerned with Congress’ rush to repeal the Medi-Cal expansion, Covered California affordability assistance, and other Affordable Care Act benefits, especially without any replacement in place.

Congress and the President promised to repeal the ACA, but in the same breath promised a replacement, one that was better. They now have the responsibility to provide a plan that will cover as many people, at the same or less cost, before they go forward with any rollback.

Thirteen Congressional Representatives from California voted for the recent budget resolution to allow the repeal of the ACA and yet to show their constituents a plan to keep their promises in a replacement that provides more coverage at less cost. They–including California Representatives McCarthy, LaMalfa, Valadao, Denham, Cook, Nunes, Knight, Royce, Rohrabacher, Walters, Hunter, Issa, and Calvert–have a new bar to meet in terms of the plan that they propose.

Any attempt to repeal the ACA without a replacement, or cap or cut Medicaid, would undo this hard-won progress that benefits millions of Californians.

Health Access California has previously released a fact sheet with new numbers, by Congressional district, detailing the enrollment in both the Medi-Cal expansion and for Covered California subsidies.

Comments are closed.